Open Design

Metalbot.org connects a global community of passionate people. We're working together to release the designs for a fully functioning 3D Metal Printer and as an open source project, all the of the information and designs are absolutely free! Learn More

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Our goal is to develop a robust, friendly to use Metal 3D Printer that will truly kickstart the 'home manufacture' revolution. The Metalbot Project is meant from the start to be a heavyweight contender in the world of manufacture.

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This particular model the Value Arc MA5000-S1, Additive Printer makes use of arc welding technology to deposit large amounts of metal cheaply... the result? Fast printing speeds and cheap materials.

 

The downside? In comparison to laser sintering techniques printing resolution is vastly reduced... the solution? Subtractive manufacturing where the rough billet is milled and finished to high tolerances using traditional subtractive milling techniques...

 

It seems as though machine manufacturers are waking up to Wire-Arc deposition technology (and this is being aided by the recent expiration of key patents held on the tech)...

 

 

... the machine prints using general-purpose arc welding wire, and is priced lower than most high-end industrial level 3D metal printers on the market today, at around 30 million Japanese Yen (approximatley $243,000). Material costs can be reduced by a factor of 10, and material availability is never a problem for owners of the Value Arc, especially when compared to the other 3D metal printers available.

The price tag is still prohibitively expensive, however it is a fine example of how wire-arc hybrid technology is being proven in demanding manufacturing environments. Just imagine how much better (cheaper and and more graceful) we will be able to make this technology in an open environment!

Here is a link to the full article... http://3dprint.com/84633/mutoh-industries-value-arc-3d/

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ember autodesk sla printer

Autodesk has just released the Design files for a fully functioning stereolithography 3D Printer called 'ember'. Take a look at the promotion video below...

 

From the article: While this interesting printer won't be ready for market for another few months, we already know quite a lot about it. It is a high-resolution resin-based 3D printer, that relies on a DLP light engine to cure its resin (many other printers rely on laser technology). It features 10 micron layer thickness and 100 micron minimum feature size, and a (relatively small) build volume of 64 x 40 x 134mm. As the printer is intended for jewelry, dental structures and other highly detailed object, this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

Although stereolithography has been around as long as 3D printing the designs for Ember are completely open source.

 

Awesome!

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Posted: 14 Jul 2015 13:09 by jethro #2626
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Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.
Posted: 14 Jul 2015 11:55 by jethro #2623
jethro's Avatar
Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. It was popularised in the 1960s with the release of Letraset sheets containing Lorem Ipsum passages, and more recently with desktop publishing software like Aldus PageMaker including versions of Lorem Ipsum.

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